TIFF ’20 – Day 4: The New Corporation, Falling, Summer of 85, Pieces of a Woman

The New Corporation: The Unfortunately Necessary Sequel (Canada, 2020. Dir: Joel Bakan, Jennifer Abbott): 17 years ago, The Corporation proved a once controversial thesis: If corporations were people, they would be psychopaths. Now that they pretend to be model citizens—environmentally mindful, woke even—it’s time to look under the hood again. Sure enough, making money for shareholders remains the main goal (by law), but now they must seduce the public in order to profit. Bakan and Abbott put together the corporations’ playbook to increase their earnings while manipulating governments, the financial system and the public opinion. The New Corporation does a great job making its case and does it with panache. For at least one hour, it’s scarier than a horror movie. 4/5 prairie dogs in it for the money.

Falling (Canada/UK/Denmark, 2020. Dir: Viggo Mortensen): In his directorial debut, Viggo Mortensen explores love at its most difficult. At the center of Falling is Willis Peterson (career crowning performance by Lance Henriksen), an octogenarian battling failing health and dementia. Willis wasn’t an easy man to deal with at the best of times and now is truly impossible: His racist, homophobic and misogynistic ways are a challenge for his utterly patient and gay son (Mortensen). Henriksen’s work aside, the film is too broad to leave a mark and after one-too-many obscene tirades by Willis, it starts feeling repetitive. There’s also a moment in which the movie goes too far and destroys any empathy we may still have for the elderly hellion. Having said that, Mortensen has a way with actors and likely a future behind the camera. 2.5/5 prairie dogs aging disgracefully. Distributor: Mongrel.

Summer of 85 (France, 2020. Dir: François Ozon): After tackling some heavy themes for the last five years, prolific French filmmaker François Ozon returns to the subject that made him famous: The dark side of growing up. Summer of 85 can be described as a lighter The Talented Mr. Ripley: Alex, a closeted teen, becomes infatuated with David after he rescues him from a capsized boat. As with every relationship, everything is puppies and rainbows until David shows a darker side and Alex fails to manage his expectations (think Call Me by Your Name with a body count and better music). Never mind the captivating plot, there’s something delightful about spending time at the gorgeously shot Normandy coast. 3/5 prairie dogs enduring a cruel summer.

Pieces of a Woman  (USA/Canada, 2020. Dir: Kornél Mundruczó): One of the reasons I attend TIFF is for the dramas with teeth, sorely lacking this year. Thankfully, here comes one that will haunt my dreams. After the birth of her first child goes horribly wrong, Martha (Vanessa Kirby) reacts by shutting down and sabotaging every relationship in her life. In turn, Shawn (Shia LaBeauf), the father of the baby, falls into old patterns (addiction, violence) and fails to provide a support system for Martha. Pieces of a Woman goes after those who think mourning is a collective experience and assume platitudes make a difference. The film is sharp as a tack and reminds us that at 88, Ellen Burstyn is a force to be reckoned with. The birth-at-home procedure that kickstarts the movie is an extended single shot that amplifies the tension to unbearable levels. Pieces of a Woman flies high until the end, when it morphs into a procedural and takes an unearned, inspirational turn (yeesh). But for everything that preceded it, it’s worth watching. 4/5 prairie dogs that don’t want your stinking casserole. Distributor: Netflix.