Saskatchewan Environmental Society To Host Webinar Series On Climate Change

Hopping Through The Looking Glass Of Climate Change (photo credit: Wascana Centre in Regina March 8, 2016)

The COVID-19 pandemic may be dominating the news cycle these days, but it’s only a “symptom” of a much broader challenge we face in the coming decade related to the deteriorating state of our environment and climate change.

With everyone practicing physical distancing and society largely shutdown, our fossil fuel use has plummeted, with predictable results — predictable in the sense that there’s been a sharp reduction in our greenhouse gas emissions and other forms of air and water pollution.

While a welcome reprieve from our head-long rush toward climate chaos, the effect is only likely to be temporary, as once the pandemic passes, pressure will ramp up for a return to “normal”.

In the midst of this nature enforced time-out, the Saskatchewan Environmental Society is taking the opportunity to host a series of 11 free webinars on Saskatchewan’s current reality with respect to climate change and potential opportunities for the future.

The webinars will run on Tuesdays and Thursdays from May 12 to June 16, and will include a one-hour presentation starting at noon, followed by a half-hour Q&A. A wide-range of topics will be discussed from renewable energy and food production to electric vehicles, net-zero buildings, urban planning and potential benefits of green energy for Indigenous communities.

Get more details on the Saskatchewan Environmental Society’s webinar series here.


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Author: Gregory Beatty

Greg Beatty is a crime-fighting shapeshifter who hatched from a mutagenic egg many decades ago. He likes sunny days, puppies and antique shoes. His favourite colour is not visible to your inferior human eyes. He refuses to write a bio for this website and if that means Whitworth writes one for him, so be it.