Queen City Catch Up: The Special Two-Part Finale!

This is it! The eighth and final instalment of Queen City Catch Up! And it’s a special double episode. I ended up with two interviews recorded so instead of using one and tossing the other I mashed them together.

In the first half, I interview Dr Sharon Acoose from First Nations University. We talk about the Truth And Reconciliation Commission and about her book, An Arrow In My Heart: A First Nation Woman’s Account of Survival from the Streets to the Height of Academia.

Then, in the second half, I talk to Adam Martin, the director of the Sakewewak Artists’ Collective. We talk about the Storyteller’s Festival and some of the other projects they have on the go.

And with that, I’m done. I’m totally caught on absolutely everything of substance that happened in Regina over the last nine or ten months or so. I can now get back to the business of whatever it is I do in this city. Many thanks to everyone who took part in the podcast. I enjoyed all these conversations.

You can find all the earlier episodes on the Queen City Catch Up archive page.

Music for this podcast is from the album Malta’s Lost Voices — which I love! — and it’s all used with permission. Many thanks to Filfla Records for letting us use these tracks. You can get your own copy of the album and check out their other projects at their website.

Author: Paul Dechene

Paul Dechene is 5'10'' tall and he was born in a place. He's not there now. He's sitting in front of his computer writing his bio for this blog. He has a song stuck in his head. It's "Girl From Ipanema", thanks for asking. You can follow Paul on Twitter at @pauldechene and get live updates during city council meetings and other city events at @PDcityhall.

One thought on “Queen City Catch Up: The Special Two-Part Finale!”

  1. I like Dr Sharon Acoose. She tells it how it is.
    What I would love her to explain why there is such a variation when it comes to Residential schools, both now grown up ladies and men were very affected.
    But when it comes to missing and murdered aboriginal women, why is the focus only on women and not murdered or missing men as well?

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