31 Days Of Family Horror Fun: A Quiet Place

Most of Earth’s human and animal population have been wiped out by mysterious blind aliens that hunt by sound. The Abbott family have been trying to survive. While on a scavenging trip to a town, Lee Abbott (John Krasinski, who also directs), his wife Evelyn (Emily Blunt) and their children deaf Regan (Millicent Simmonds), Marcus (Noah Jupe) and the youngest Beau (Cade Woodward) looks for supplies in a store.

The family all communicate using sign language so the creatures aren’t alerted to their presence. Beau finds an electronic toy which Leon their e tells him is too noisy and won’t let him bring. As everyone leaves Regan hands the toy back to Beau who puts the batteries back in it. On their walk back Beau turns on the toy with horrifying results.

A year later the family has moved on trying to survive. Evelyn is pregnant and they have been trying to sound proof the basement for the baby. Regan blames herself for the death of her brother and Lee has avoided talking about it to her.

While out fishing Lee and Marcus find an old man in the woods whose wife has just been killed by an alien creature. The old man yells and the creature attacks him while Lee and Marcus run for it. Meanwhile Evelyn starts to go into labour.

This is a excellent thriller, the monsters look great and the forced quiet creates excellent tension.


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Author: Shane Hnetka

Shane Hnetka spends most of his life watching movies and reading comic books, using his vast knowledge of genre culture for evil instead of good.